Is inflation killing America’s retirement dream? Four in ten investors say higher prices have destroyed plans for their later years | ET REALITY

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Is inflation killing America’s retirement dream? Four in ten investors say higher prices have destroyed plans for their later years

Four in ten investors say inflation is destroying their retirement dreams, a landmark new survey reveals.

He Natixis Global Retirement Index found that rising prices were the biggest threat to investors (both retired and still working) behind fears of recession, war and high interest rates.

Experts say the world is in the midst of a so-called “silver tsunami”: a rapidly aging population is putting more pressure on different economies.

Rising gasoline prices pushed the annual US inflation rate to 3.7 percent in August, new figures revealed today.

It was the second straight month that prices rose, although the rate remains well below the peak of 9.1 percent reached last June.

The Natixis Global Retirement Index found that rising prices are the biggest threat to investors, both retired and active, behind fears of a recession, war and high interest rates.

The Natixis Global Retirement Index found that rising prices are the biggest threat to investors, both retired and active, behind fears of a recession, war and high interest rates.

The crisis has opened investors’ eyes to the threat of inflation after years of relatively stable costs.

Natixis spoke to 750 American workers for the survey. All respondents had at least $100,000 in investable assets.

However, 47 percent worried they would not have enough money to enjoy their retirement, while 31 percent feared they would never save enough to retire.

Inflation is often a greater threat for those who are unemployed, as they are on fixed incomes and do not have the option to move to higher-paying jobs or negotiate wage increases.

Dave Goodsell, executive director of the Natixis Center of Investor Insight, told Bloomberg: ‘The big rise in inflation will hit people hard, who have a lot of lingering financial trauma.

“For people on fixed incomes, those increases in food and energy forced them to make difficult decisions.”

Inflation in the US has accelerated for the second consecutive month to an annual rate of 3.7 percent, up from 3.2 percent in August.

Inflation in the US has accelerated for the second consecutive month to an annual rate of 3.7 percent, up from 3.2 percent in August.

Analysts say the increase is due to a few select items, such as gas and housing, which are notoriously volatile, while most prices remained stable.

Analysts say the increase is due to a few select items, such as gas and housing, which are notoriously volatile, while most prices remained stable.

Overall, the United States ranked 13th among Natixis’ top 25 countries for financial security in retirement. It marked a drop of two spots for the US, which was ranked 11th in 2022.

Switzerland took first place, followed by South Korea, Australia and Singapore.

It comes after figures from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics released today showed that the annual inflation rate is now around 3.7 percent, well above the Federal Reserve’s target rate of 2 percent. hundred.

Rampant inflation has prompted an aggressive campaign of interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve, which has seen rates rise from near zero to a 22-year high.

Despite the latest spike in inflation, the Central Bank is expected to keep interest rates steady while it decides whether a further rate hike will be necessary later this year to combat inflation.

Core inflation, which excludes volatile prices including food and energy and is considered a better indicator of long-term trends, remained mostly subdued.

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